One thing I love about Calvin is that no matter how bad his point is, he always makes it convincingly.

One thing I love about Calvin is that no matter how bad his point is, he always makes it convincingly.

I remember I was given a collection of Calvin & Hobbes strips ("Revenge of the Babysat") one year as a birthday present.  Bill Watterson wrote & illustrated one strip per day for a decade.  His acidic tone appealed to me immediately but it was his pervasive sense of wonder that kept me coming back.

Even the greats have off days ;)

Even the greats have off days ;)

As I've grown older, what's continued to amaze me about C&H is its ability to convey a complex idea in just a few panels.  There's a ruthless efficiency at play & yet, despite the inevitability of the final-panel punch line it rarely feels like a formula & you never feel short changed.

It's exactly the same with film & video, especially when you're working inside the commercial space.  You start with an idea, allow it to grow organically & then prune it back to just the bare essentials.  The viewer needs to buy into the concept & emotionally connect to the pay off in the shortest time possible.  All without any evidence of the process itself being visible.

This strip is one of my favourites.  I suspect it came about after a particularly harsh conversation with an art critic.

This strip is one of my favourites.  I suspect it came about after a particularly harsh conversation with an art critic.

It's no coincidence that every major production is storyboarded before a single frame is shot.  I regularly get asked who my favourite filmmaker is, or what my favourite movie is.  I'm never able to give people a satisfactory answer.  My single biggest influence though?  It will always be Calvin & Hobbes.

Brecon James

Co-Founder Luminary Studios

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